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The state of Tennessee does not want the public to know who has been issued a NPDES Permit. If you go to this link it will not show up. You have to click another link to get to this one. This is a serious breach of the Freedom of Information Act.!!!!! http://environment-online.state.tn.us:7654/pls/enf_reports/f?p=9034:34001:0:::::

 

Click here for 2012 303d and 303b reports and other important info from Tennessee >>>

www.tn.gov/environment/water/water-quality_publications.shtml

 

 

Please donate so we can give jobs to law students by creating an environmental law firm to fight for what's right.

 

 

 

 

GOD'S LAWS

But Destruction and Death speak of knowing something about it! And God surely knows where it is to be found, for he looks throughout the whole earth, under all the heavens. He makes the winds blow and sets the boundries of the oceans. He makes the laws of the rain and a path for the lightning. He knows where the wisdom is and declares it to all who will listen. He established it and examined it thoroughly. And this is what he says to all mankind: 'Look, to fear the Lord is true wisdom; to forske evil is real understanding.'"     Job 28:1-28

MAN'S LAWS

The Clean Water Act is a 1977 amendment to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972, which set the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants to waters of the United States.

The law gave EPA the authority to set effluent standards on an industry basis (technology-based) and continued the requirements to set water quality standards for all contaminants in surface waters. The CWA makes it unlawful for any person to discharge any pollutant from a point source into navigable waters unless a permit (NPDES) is obtained under the Act.

The 1977 amendments focused on toxic pollutants. In 1987, the CWA was reauthorized and again focused on toxic substances, authorized citizen suit provisions, and funded sewage treatment plants (POTW's) under the Construction Grants Program.

The CWA provisions for the delegation by EPA of many permitting, administrative, and enforcement aspects of the law to state governments. In states with the authority to implement CWA programs, EPA still retains oversight responsibilities.

 

MARINE SANITATION DEVICES

Marine Sanitation Devices
All recreational boats with installed toilet facilities must have an operable marine sanitation device (MSD) on board. Vessels 65 feet and under may use a Type I, II or III MSD. Vessels over 65 feet must install a Type II or III MSD. All installed MSDs must be Coast Guard certified. Coast Guard certified devices are so labeled except for some holding tanks, which are certified by definition under the regulations.

When operating a vessel on a body of water where the discharge of treated or untreated sewage is prohibited the operator must secure the device in a manner which prevents any discharge. Some acceptable methods are: padlocking overboard discharge valves in the closed position, using non releasable wire tie to hold overboard discharge valves in the closed position, closing overboard discharge valves and removing the handle, locking the door, with padlock or keylock, to the space enclosing the toilets (for Type I and Type II only).

US Coast Guard

 

Federal Requirements and Safety Tips for Recreational Boats

Pollution Regulations

The Refuse Act of 1899 prohibits throwing, discharging or depositing any refuse matter of any kind (including trash, garbage, oil, and other liquid pollutants into the waters of the United States.

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or hazardous substances which may be harmful into U.S. navigable waters. Vessels 26 feet in length and over must display a placard at least 5 by 8 inches, made of durable material, fixed in a conspicuous place in the machinery spaces, or at the bilge pump control station, stating the following:

Discharge of Oil Prohibited
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or oily waste upon or into any navigable waters of the U.S. The prohibition includes any discharge which causes a film or discoloration of the surface of the water or causes a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of the water. Violators are subject to substantial civil and/or criminal sanctions including fines and imprisonment.

Regulations issued under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act require all vessels with propulsion machinery to have a capacity to retain oily mixtures on board and be equipped with a fixed or portable means to discharge these oily mixtures to a reception facility. On recreational vessels, a bucket, oil absorbent pads and heavy duty plastic bag, bailer or portable pump are some suitable means that meet the requirement for retention on board until transfering the oily mixture to a reception facility. No person may intentionally drain oil or oily waste from any source into the bilge of any vessel. You must immediately notify the U.S. Coast Guard if your vessel discharges oil or hazardous substances in the water. Call toll-free 800-424-8802 (In Washington, D.C. (202) 267-3675).

Report the following information:

location, size, source, color, time observed, substances.

  Discharge of Garbage Prohibited
The Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (MARPOL ANNEX V) places limitations on the discharge of garbage from vessels. It is illegal to dump plastic trash anywhere in the ocean or navigable waters of the United States. It is also illegal to discharge garbage in the navigable waters of the United States, including inland waters as well as anywhere in the Great Lakes. The discharge of other types of garbage is permitted outside of specific distances offshore as determined by the nature of that garbage.

Garbage Type

 

Discharge

Plastics includes synthetic ropes, fishing nets, and plastic bags

Prohibited in all areas

Floating dunnage, lining and packing materials

 

Prohibited less than 25 miles from nearest land

Food waste, paper, rags, glass, metal, bottles, crockery and similar refuse

 

Prohibited less than 12 miles from nearest land

Comminuted or ground food waste, paper, rags, glass, etc.

 

Prohibited less than 3 miles from nearest land

United States vessels of 26 feet or longer must display in a prominent location, a durable placard at least 4 by 9 inches notifying the crew and passengers of the discharge restrictions.

United States oceangoing vessels of 40 feet or longer, which are engaged in commerce or are equipped with a galley and berthing must have a written Waste Management Plan describing the procedures for collecting, processing, storing and discharging garbage, and designate the person who is in charge of carrying out the plan.